Upper School Courses

Courses taught using a problem-based approach are indicated by (PBI).
Courses taught using a direct instruction approach are indicated by (DI).
Dual enrollment offerings with Missouri Baptist University are indicated by (E).
Advanced Placement courses are indicated by (AP).

Algebra I (DI) (9th Grade) – 1 Unit
Students study the traditional topics of Algebra I. This course is designed to communicate that math is important as a modeling and problem solving tool. Students will:

  • Learn the terminology and symbols of algebra.

  • Review and use fractions, decimals, percents, ratios, and proportions.

  • Create and use expressions and equations to solve problems.

  • Simplify rational, radical, and polynomial expressions.

  • Write and solve linear equations and linear systems.

  • Recognize that a constant rate of change produces a linear graph.

  • Graph linear functions using slope.

  • Solve quadratic equations.

  • Review operations with polynomials.

  • Use basic geometric and algebraic properties and formulas to solve problems.

Key Text: TBA

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Algebra I Concepts (DI) – 1 Unit
Students study the traditional topics of Algebra I. The small class size allows the teacher to differentiate instruction to meet the individual needs of learners. Students will:

  • Learn the terminology and symbols of algebra.

  • Review and use fractions, decimals, percents, ratios, and proportions.

  • Create and use expressions and equations to solve problems.

  • Simplify rational, radical, and polynomial expressions.

  • Write and solve linear equations and linear systems.

  • Recognize that a constant rate of change produces a linear graph.

  • Graph linear functions using slope.

  • Solve quadratic equations.

  • Review operations with polynomials.

  • Use basic geometric and algebraic properties and formulas to solve problems.

Key Text: TBA

Geometry Honors (PBI) – 1 Unit
Students use a problem-based approach to study the traditional topics of geometry. The pace of the class allows for additional topics and accommodates deeper exploration of the following concepts, in turn preparing students for Algebra II:

  • Learn the tools, terminology, and symbols of geometry.

  • Investigate and discover the properties of triangles, quadrilaterals, and circles.

  • Calculate the perimeters and areas of plane figures.

  • Study vectors and their applications to velocity and forces in physics.

  • Learn to identify and solve problems using congruent or similar figures.

  • Calculate the volume and surface area of three-dimensional figures.

  • Develop deductive reasoning skills using two-column and coordinate proofs.

  • Solve circle problems involving chords, secants, and tangents.

Key Text: Honors Geometry, adapted from Ben Lippen Christian High School and Phillips Exeter Academy

 

Geometry (DI) – 1 Unit
In this course the standard topics of Euclidean geometry are developed using the traditional synthetic approach, the analytical coordinate approach, and the modern transformational approach. Both inductive and deductive thinking skills are developed as students move from informal reasoning to formal proof. Extensive amounts of algebra and trigonometry are interwoven throughout the course. Students will:

  • Learn the tools, terminology, and symbols of geometry.

  • Investigate and discover the properties of triangles, quadrilaterals, and circles.

  • Calculate the perimeters and areas of plane figures.

  • Study vectors and their applications to velocity and forces in physics.

  • Learn to identify and solve problems using congruent or similar figures.

  • Calculate the volume and surface area of three-dimensional figures.

  • Develop deductive reasoning skills using two-column and coordinate proofs.

  • Solve circle problems involving chords, secants, and tangents.

Key Text: Geometry, Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Co., 2011

 

Geometry Concepts (DI) – 1 Unit
Material is presented in a step-by-step method that emphasizes the major geometric concepts. Hands-on activities and other manipulative aides are used to further meet the needs of these special learners. Topics covered in this course include recognizing various types of two- and three-dimensional figures, including their particular parts and properties; finding area, volume, perimeter, circumference, and surface area; and learning to measure and draw angles, segments, and other figures that make geometry possible. Students will:

  • More fully develop their ability to recognize, measure, and work with various geometric shapes and figures.

  • Learn to utilize vocabulary related to geometry and its concepts.

  • Learn from one another through review activities and hands-on projects.

  • Gain self-confidence in the area of mathematics to support further efforts in higher math classes.

Key Text: Geometry Concepts and Skills, McDougal Littell, 2003; Discovering Geometry, Key Curriculum Press, 2008

 

Algebra II Honors (PBI) – 1 Unit
Students use a problem-based approach to study the traditional topics of Algebra II. The pace of the class allows for additional topics and accommodates deeper exploration of the following concepts. This course prepares students for Precalculus by focusing on the following:

  • Quadratic, exponential, absolute value, and power  models for sets of data points

  • Rational functions

  • Polynomial functions

  • Trigonometry functions

Key Text: Math 2 – adapted from Phillips Exeter Academy
Prerequisite: Grade of B or above in Honors Geometry and/or teacher recommendation

Algebra II (DI) – 1 Unit
Study of the topics in Algebra II will allow students the opportunity to build on concepts learned in Algebra I and Geometry. Students will learn to work with and solve problems algebraically, graphically, and with a graphing calculator in these main areas of study:

  • Linear equations, inequalities, and systems

  • Quadratic functions and relations

  • Polynomials and polynomial functions

  • Roots and powers

  • Exponential and logarithmic functions and equations

  • Patterns of growth and rates of change

  • Rational functions and equations.

Key Text: Algebra 2, McDougal Littell, 2008
Prerequisite: Geometry

Algebra II Concepts (DI) – 1 Unit
In this course, material is presented in a step-by-step format at a pace dictated by the needs of the students.  The main goal is to increase students’ algebraic understanding to better prepare them for the ACT test and college mathematics. Students will learn to work with and solve problems in these main areas of study:

  • Linear and quadratic equations and inequalities.

  • Linear equations and inequalities in two variables.

  • Systems of linear equations

  • Polynomial, rational, exponential and radical expressions and equations.

Key Text: Algebra 2, Cord Communications, 2011

  

Precalculus & Statistics (AP) (DI) – 1 Unit
This course begins with a thorough treatment of functions, which will prepare students for AP Calculus. It concludes with the topics covered on the AP Statistics exam. Students will:

  • Study algebraic, exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions; limits; and parametric equations.

  • Learn to use the function model as the primary tool for solving problems involving variables.

  • Learn methods and strategies for exploring, organizing, and describing data using graphs and numerical summaries.

  • Learn how to design samples and experiments in order to produce the data needed to give clear answers to specific questions.

  • Study probability, how it is used to describe randomness, and why it is the basis of statistical inference.

  • Study the basic methods of statistical inference: confidence intervals and tests of significance.

Key Texts: Functions Modeling Change, 2nd edition 2004, John Wiley & Sons; The Practice of Statistics, 4th edition, 2012, W. H. Freeman
Prerequisites: Grade of B+ or above in Honors Algebra II and/or teacher recommendation

Precalculus Honors (PBI) (DI) – 1 Unit
This course consists of a thorough treatment of algebraic and transcendental functions. Functions will be represented with words, tables, formulas, and graphs. Students will use the function model as the primary tool for solving  problems involving variables. This course will prepare students for AP Calculus. Students will study:

  • The transcendental functions (trigonometric, inverse trigonometric, exponential and logarithmic).

  • Function topics such as transformations, compositions, decompositions, inverses, rates of change and limits.

  • Piecewise defined functions and parametric equations.

Key Text: TBA
Prerequisite: Algebra II and/or teacher recommendation

College Algebra (E) (DI) – 1 Unit
This course is designed as a comprehensive treatment of algebraic and exponential functions. Each function will be examined in terms of its formula, graph, table of values and applications. Students will use the function model for problem solving involving variables. Students will gain a conceptual understanding of functions, as well as technical skill in using their properties. The goal of this course is for students to see the power and beauty of algebra and to build a solid foundation for further mathematics courses. Students will study:

  • Real number system: its operations and properties.

  • Expressions, equations, inequalities and intervals.

  • Linear, absolute value, quadratic, and polynomial functions.

  • Power functions and radical functions.

  • Exponential and logarithmic functions.

  • Transformations of functions and their graphs.

  • Solving systems of equations and using matrices.

  • Probability and counting principles.

  • Sequences and series.

Key Texts: TBA
Prerequisite: Grade of C or above in Algebra II

Advanced Math Concepts (DI) – 1 Unit
This course is designed for students who desire a college preparatory mathematics elective.  Material is presented in a step-by-step format at a pace dictated by the needs of the student.  This course is designed to give students practical applications of math in and outside the classroom, a foundation in mathematical disciplines, and a better background for the college experience. Students will cover the following units:

  • Problem Solving Strategies

  • Real Number Theory

  • Scientific Notation and Conversion

  • Financial Applications in Math

  • Probability

  • Statistics

  • Worldview Perspectives in Math

  • Algebraic & Geometric Theory

  • Graph Theory and Discrete Math

Key texts: Math in Our World, 2011, McGraw Hill

 

Calculus AB (AP) (DI) – 1 Unit
This course in single-variable calculus includes both the techniques and the applications of the derivative and the definite integral along with terminology of limits. Each calculus topic is examined using verbal, algebraic, numerical and graphical representations. Students will use graphing calculators for exploration and in problem solving to find limits, derivatives and integrals. Students will gain a deep understanding of the ideas of calculus, as well as technical skill in applying derivatives and integrals. Students will discover the logic of calculus and build a strong foundational understanding of the fundamental ideas and methods of calculus in preparation for further study. Students will:

  • Calculate average and instantaneous rates of change using the notation of limits.

  • Develop an understanding of the derivative and discover the rules for differentiation.

  • Use derivatives to analyze the graphs of functions to determine extrema and inflection points.

  • Acquire an understanding of the Riemann sum and the definite integral.

  • Learn the methods of implicit and logarithmic differentiation and apply those methods in related rate problems.

  • Study the important theorems of calculus: Mean Value, Extreme Value and Intermediate Value Theorems.

  • Develop skill in finding indefinite integrals (antiderivatives) and discover the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus.

  • Use definite integrals to find area, volume, the length of a curve and the amount of change in a quantity.

  • Solve differential equations and apply them in modeling rates in business and the physical sciences.

  • Learn the techniques of integration by parts, algebraic and trigonometric substitution, and partial fractions.

  • Study the approximation of functions using tangent lines and Taylor Polynomials.

Key Text: Interactive AP Calculus Binder, Haas, Winter Park Publishing, updated 2014
Supplementary Text: Calculus, Early Transcendentals, 7th edition, AP edition, James Stewart, Brooks/Cole, 2012
Prerequisites: Grade of C or above in Precalculus (Honors) and/or teacher recommendation

 

Calculus BC (AP) (DI) – 1 Unit
This is a course in multivariable calculus where students study the calculus of functions of several variables. The course emphasizes the topics needed for the BC Calculus AP exam. Students will study the calculus of plane curves using parametric equations. Polar coordinates will be used for finding areas and arc lengths. Euler’s method will be used to approximate the solution to differential equations and the logistic model will be studied in depth. Students will gain further skills in integration techniques such as integration by parts, partial fractions, and trigonometric substitution as well as examine improper integrals. Students will study the calculus of Taylor polynomials and series. Vectors will be used to study the geometry of three-dimensional space using the rectangular, cylindrical and spherical coordinate systems. Students will learn the differentiation and integration of vector-valued functions to measure arc length, curvature, velocity, and acceleration. Partial derivatives, directional derivatives, and gradient vectors will assist students in finding tangent planes, normal lines, and the extrema of functions of two variables.  Double, iterated, and triple integrals will be used to find surface areas and volumes using the rectangular, cylindrical and spherical coordinate systems. Vector analysis will include vector fields, line integrals, Green’s Theorem, surface integrals, the Divergence Theorem, and Stoke’s Theorem.

Key Text: Multivariable Calculus, 7th edition, James Stewart, Brooks/Cole, 2011.
Prerequisite: Algebra II, Grade of B or above in Calculus AB (AP), and/or teacher recommendation.

Statistics (AP) (DI) – 1 Unit
This course includes the topics covered on the AP Statistics exam. Students will:

  • Learn methods and strategies for exploring, organizing, and describing data using graphs and numerical summaries.

  • Learn how to design samples and experiments in order to produce the data needed to give clear answers to specific questions.

  • Study probability, how it is used to describe randomness, and why it is the basis of statistical inference.

  • Study the basic methods of statistical inference: confidence intervals and tests of significance.

Key Text: The Practice of Statistics, 4th edition, 2011
Prerequisites: Grade of B or above in Honors Algebra II and/or teacher recommendation

 

Statistics (DI) – 1 Unit
This is an introductory course in statistics. The focus of this course is on statistical ideas and reasoning and their relevance to today’s world. Students will:

  • Learn methods and strategies for exploring, organizing, and describing data using graphs and numerical summaries.

  • Learn how to design samples and experiments in order to produce the data needed to give clear answers to specific questions.

  • Study probability, how it is used to describe randomness, and why it is the basis of statistical inference.

  • Study the basic methods of statistical inference: confidence intervals and tests of significance.

Key Texts: Statistics Through Applications, 2nd edition, 2011.
Prerequisite: Algebra II

 

Computer Programming with Visual BASIC ½ Unit
Students learn Microsoft Visual BASIC 10 and concepts used in object-oriented programming. Basic programming skills are applied to practical problems and ideas. Students will learn data structures common to all programming languages and demonstrate problem-solving and creative program design skills while using Visual Basic 10.

Key Text: Microsoft Visual Basic 10, Comprehensive, Shelley and Corinne Hoisington

 

Computer Programming with C++ ½  Unit
In this programming class, students will learn how to develop computer programs using the C++ programming language. The class begins with structured C++ programming and moves to object-oriented programming including C++ class design. Through a variety of class projects, students will learn the syntax, concepts, and tools necessary to create computer programs that will solve puzzles, simulate physics models, and interact with routines written by their classmates.

Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation.